In St. Louis is an annual project designed to explore — through the experiences, scholarship, work, and voices of St. Louisans — what it means to be in St. Louis today.

The 5th anniversary of the Ferguson uprising, the movement that followed, and the work ahead is our entry point for reflection in this inaugural offering. In St. Louis is a project of Washington University’s Academy for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, in partnership with the Office of Public Affairs.

Five years after the uprising in Ferguson, what does it mean to be in St. Louis?


A Systemic Change

A Systemic Change

Civil rights and immigration attorney Javad Khazaeli describes how the justice system in St. Louis can make life difficult for everyday St. Louisans, and discusses the frustration that led to the protests in Ferguson.
Everyday People Can Speak Up

Everyday People Can Speak Up

What can everyday people do to support racial equity? These St. Louisans who are invested in racial equity work say everyday people can do something simple but powerful: speak up.
New Kind of Leadership

New Kind of Leadership

Organizer and activist Brittany Ferrell talks about the new kind of leaders who emerged in the Ferguson uprising, and the impact of the new approach those leaders brought to the movement.
Tension

Tension

Lara Granich explains why tension in our processes, institutions, relationships and communities helps hold people accountable and keep us moving forward — and what happens when we pretend that tension doesn’t exist.
The Conversation About Race

The Conversation About Race

Laura Horwitz, Co-Founder and Executive Director of We Stories, says that everyone talks about the conversation we need to have about race — but as long as families of color talk about race more regularly than white families, it’s difficult to have an effective conversation.
Trouble the Water

Trouble the Water

In his course, “Don't Believe the Hype: Race, Media and Social Movements in America, 1915 to 2015,” Vernon Mitchell Jr. helps students understand the construction of racial narratives through media, and how that affects their experience in St. Louis — and the world.